Beyond Facebook

Business Journalism

Business journalism is the branch of journalism that tracks, records, analyzes and interprets the business, economic and financial activities and changes that take place in a society. Topics widely cover the entire purview of all business activities related to the economy of a nation.

This area of journalism covers news and feature articles about people, places and issues related to the field of business. Most newspapers, magazines, radio, and television news shows carry a business segment. However, detailed and in depth business journalism can be found in publications, radio, and television channels dedicated specifically to business and financial journalism.

History

Business journalism began as early as the Middle Ages, to help well-known trading families communicate with each other.[1] In 1882 Charles Dow, Edward Jones and Charles Bergstresser began a wire service that delivered news to investment houses along Wall Street.[1] And in 1889 The Wall Street Journal began publishing.[1] While the famous muckraking journalist Ida Tarbell did not consider herself to be a business reporter, her reporting and writing about the Standard Oil Co. in 1902 provided the template for how thousands of business journalists have covered companies ever since.[2] Business coverage gained prominence in the 1990s, with wider investment in the stock market. The Wall Street Journal is one prominent example of business journalism, and is among the United States of America’s top newspapers in terms of both circulation and respect for the journalists whose work appears there.

Personnel

Journalists who work in this branch class as “business journalists”. Their main purpose is gathering information about current events in the economic life of the[which?] country. They may also cover processes, trends, consequences, and important people, in business and disseminate their work through all types of mass media.

Scope

Business journalism, although common in most industrialized countries, has a very limited role in third-world and developing countries. This leaves citizens of such countries in a very disadvantaged position locally and internationally.[citation needed] Recent efforts to bring business media to these countries have proven to be worthwhile.

Leave a Reply